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Daube Froide/Beef in Aspic (Réunion Island)

April 5, 2021

ingredients:
2 pounds thinly sliced lean beef (from the rump or round)
¼ pound lean bacon strips
2 onions
2 shallots
2 cloves garlic
1 handful parsley
1 sprig thyme, or ½ teaspoon dried
1 bay leaf
salt, pepper
nutmeg
4 ounces fresh bacon fat
1 Tablespoon flour
2 cups dry white wine
1 calf’s foot
1 teaspoon agar-agar or Japanese Moss
1 cup beef bouillon

instructions:

  1. Flatten the beef slices and season with salt and pepper.
  2. Chop one onion, the shallots, garlic and parsley. Sprinkle in the finely chopped thyme and bay leaf. Add salt, pepper, and grated nutmeg to taste. Mix thoroughly.
  3. On each slice of beef place a slice of bacon and spread some of the herb mixture on it. Pile the seasoned slices into a “tower” and press as flat as possible. End with a slice of beef, then tie the entire pile together with string so it will not fall apart while cooking.
  4. Mince the bacon fat and the remaining onion, sprinkle with flour, and add any remaining herb mixture there may be. Brown lightly in a Dutch oven. Add the wine, the calf’s foot, and the securely-tied beef slices. Cover and cook over low heat for 3 hours.
  5. When done, remove the meat from the pot. Dissolve the agar-agar in the bouillon and add it to the liquid in the Dutch oven.
  6. Place the meat into a mold and strain the liquid over it. Refrigerate. The sauce will jell. Unmold when ready to serve, and garnish with sprigs of parsley.

This dish is ideal for a meal served outdoors. As agar-agar and Japanese Moss are not readily obtainable, plan unflavored gelatine may be substituted, using a little less liquid than the instructions call for, in order to obtain a stiffer gelatine.


© Shufunotomo Co., Ltd., Japan, 1971. Published in the United States and Canada by BOBLEY PUBLISHING; a division of Illustrated World Encyclopedia, Inc. Printed in Japan.

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