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Tongue in Aspic

July 11, 2016

tongue_in_aspic

1 cup dry white wine
1 can (10 12 oz) condensed beef consommé, undiluted
3 medium onions, peeled
3 whole cloves
2 tablespoons salt
2 bay leaves, crumbled
6 whole black peppers
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 smoked tongue (about 5 lb)

Aspic
1 envelope unflavored gelatine
1 cup dry white wine
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Lettuce leaves
4 hard-cooked eggs, peeled and halved

1. in 6-quart Dutch oven, combine 6 cups water, 1 cup wine, and consommé. Add 2 onions, quartered, and one onion, studded with whole cloves. Add 2 tablespoons salt, bay leaves, black peppers, and thyme. Bring to boiling, covered.

2. Meanwhile, wash tongue under cold running water. Add tongue to boiling liquid. Return to boiling; reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 3 hours, or until tender.

3. Lift out tongue; let cool. With sharp knife, carefully remove skin; cut off and discard root. Refrigerate tongue until well chilled, 4 hours or overnight.

4. Slice tongue thinly on the diagonal. On platter, arrange slices, slightly overlapping. Refrigerate while making aspic.

5. Make Aspic: Sprinkle gelatine over wine in small saucepan; let stand to soften, 5 minutes. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and lemon juice. Over low heat, dissolve gelatine, stirring. Refrigerate, until consistency of unbeaten egg white.

6. Brush aspic on sliced tongue, making thin glaze. Refrigerate tongue (not remaining aspic) to set; reglaze. Refrigerate until serving, at least 1 hour. At serving time, garnish platter with lettuce and hard-cooked eggs. Makes 6 servings.


© Copyright 1973 by The McCall Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. bunnytee permalink
    July 12, 2016 6:12 pm

    Stumbling upon this unfortunate recipe, I am forced to wonder: who first thought-let’s rip the tongue out of that cow and eat it? Then later, wouldn’t this be nice sheathed in meat jelly?
    Then the 50s happened and that spawned the whole Let’s mix Jello with everything from tuna.to tongue!Who were these people and what, specifically was their major malfunction in the comestibles department?

  2. Sterling permalink
    December 24, 2016 7:14 pm

    I love tongue in aspic. But then again, I love aspics; tomato aspic, perfection salad (a vegetable aspic), creamy salmon aspic with horseradish, etc. to mention just a few of the “beginner” types of aspics. What ticks me off are those cooks who do not know how to make or serve an aspic, stumble their way through the basic recipe and then declare it totally worthless. I guess in today’s world, everyone who “thinks, is therefore an expert.” sorry Descartes.

    I have served tongue in aspic many times on a buffet table The secrete of my cocktail party success is that 1. I never tell guests what is on the table unless there is a dietary restriction, and b. I never experiment with my guests. I know what I am going to serve and how it will turn out. If it is not perfect, it never leaves the kitchen. And on the note of tongue, in all the years I have served it, there has never been a leftover piece. When cooked correctly, it tastes like the meat was injected with butter and the whole piece just melts in your mouth.

    Due to the limited American palate and diet (If you doubt me, check out just the appetizer list in any restaurant you frequent. It is rare there is ever any variation. The menu usually goes downhill from there.) you can’t judge the quality or uniqueness of a food by testing on folks who believes fast food and chain restaurants rule the culinary world. There is no skill in cooking a steak. Give the credit to the cow, if you must credit someone.

    If you want to see why the many forms and uses of tongue and aspics, consult or rather taste the food of a chef (not a self-made cook), who understands the art and chemistry of creating such dishes and then try a bite and chew (not just the tip of your tongue that only has taste buds for sweet) to find out why both are culinary delights and have lasted the test of time.

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